The Contented Angler
147 Jefferson Avenue
Lower Burrell, PA. 15068
724-337-0437
EMAIL
LINE
SINGLE HAND
SHORT BELLY
50' - 60'
MEDIUM BELLY
60' - 70'
LONG BELLY
70' +
6
160
420
460
600
7
185
470
510
650
8
210
530
570
710
9
240
600
640
780
10
280
680
720
860
11
340
770
810
950
12
380
870
910
1050
AFFTA SPEY LINE STANDARDS
One day, you may decide that you are bored with fly fishing, or maybe you just want to explore
another aspect of it. The next logical step is the two handed rod. When you first look at a two
hander, you are going to see something like: 14'0  7/8   450 - 700 grains. Okay, you already have a 7 /
8 reel, you just need a 7/8 line. Going by the chart below, you can see that if you bought a standard
7/8 line, you are not even going to be close to loading the rod. The next surprise is that you are
going to find  that your 7/8 reel probably won't hold 100 yds. of backing, 100 ft. of running line and
the belly or spey line. If you are using a line like the Airflo Delta Spey, you don't need the running
line, but the line may be too long for where you are fishing. It is important that you have the rear
taper of the line out of the rod tip so you are at the optimum casting point.

Lines: I'm afraid we are not out of the woods yet. As you expolore the different lines you will see
things like: Skagit Compact, Scandi Compact and Skagit/Switch to name a few. The Skagit and
Scandi lines are short, usually 30ft. heads that you loop to your running line. Once again, the 30ft
head needs to be outside of the rod tip to work properly. You also have to be careful that you don't
have too much running line or "overhang" beyond the rod tip. The running line simply won't
support the head to make the cast. It's just like a typical shooting head.

Skagit - The Skagit head is designed to cast heavy sink tips and large flies easily, and it does. Skagit
casting was born in the Northwest. People like Dec Hogan, Ed Ward and Scott Howell are
responsible for this type of casting and it is every bit as artistic as standard Spey casting. Look at the
diameter of these skagit lines before you choose a reel. You will be amazed! A large Intruder is no
match for these lines. Thank God, there is still not an AFFTA standard for Skagit lines. Stay towards
the high end of the grain window when choosing a skagit line.

Scandi - Originated in Scandinavia, duh! An underhand style of casting where instead of using a
sustained anchor, the fly just "kisses" the water" before you send it for a ride. The bottom hand
comes into play more with this type of casting.
Switch Rod - The latest definition is: A rod that will perform all of the different  casts and can
also be used as a single hand rod for overhead casting, although, most of the handles are
made too long for comfortable overhand casting. There is no reason for the handle to be
this long.

Switch Rods are usually in the 11'0 range and are available in 4 - 10wt. The advantage is that
you need very little room behind you to make a cast.

If you're sure the line is a spey line, then you can go by the number on the box, but it's best
to go by the grain weight, especially for overhead casting. If you're planning on using a
standard line for overhead casting you are going to have to go about two line sizes heavier.

The Wulff Ambush line has become a popular switch line, but please see our
TFO Deer Creek
Switch rod page for more info. Royal Wulff has an in depth article on their site on how to use
this line. The Skagit/Switch from Airflo is also a good choice.

Leaders: Okay, we're almost there. Except for Skagit casting, I like the leader to be the same
length as the rod. If you're using a skagit setup and you have 8' of sink tip, the most you
need is 3ft. of tippet, unless you don't want the fly to be as deep as the sink tip.

Blue Sky makes a furled leader for spey casting that works quite well. Poly leaders from
Airflo also work well. Whether furled or Poly, just add the appropriate amount of tippet. Of
course you can also build your own leader from mono.

Your Scandi leader should be 1 1/2 times the rod length. It's easy to pull the anchor with this
type of cast and the longer leader will keep you from doing this.

T Time: When you look at sink tips, you are going to see T-10, T-12 etc. The number is the
grain weight per foot. 8ft. of T-10 is 80 grains. Hold on! you also may see: Type 1 - 5. This is
how fast the tip will sink.

For more info on sink tips, please go to our s
kagit sink tips page.

Why? So we find ourselves back at the begining. Why is the grain window and the line
weight written on the rod? Because companies think you have nothing better to do but sit
and study this stuff and you are supposed to assume that they are talking about a two
handed line when they write the rod weight on the rod.
Are you confused yet?
two handed rod